Category: introspection

The Disasterous Public Parade Of Fraudulent “Survivors”

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Supposed sex-slavery survivor resigns from her own foundation after her fraudulent life history-victim narrative is exposed:

“Somaly Mam, the world-famous Cambodian campaigner against sex trafficking, one of Time’s 100 Most Influential People in the World, has stepped down from her eponymous foundation in the wake of charges that she fabricated her harrowing autobiography of having been sold into sex slavery as a child. According to an exposé in Newsweek, Mam had a normal childhood and adolescence and is remembered by neighbors as “a happy, pretty girl with pigtails.” Not only did Mam apparently invent her past, she allegedly coached others in her organization, AFESIP, to tell similarly lurid false tales. Long Pross, who has just stepped down as a spokeswoman for the Somaly Mam Foundation, claimed a pimp gouged out her eye; actually, her eye was removed in surgery for a tumor when she was 13. She was never in a brothel. Meas Rotha says Mam auditioned girls for public appearances and told her she had to lie to help other women”. (Katha Pollit, The Nation, June 4, 2014) – sex trafficking, lies and scandal

DISASTER!

It was 1985, and I was watching the amusing spectacle of fraudulent evangelical ex-satanist testimonialists –  who had escaped from the pages of Jack Chick tracts or the auditoriums of Pentacostal Churches and were making colossal fools of themselves parading their ignorance and fantasies on mainstream network television.  There was the “ex-satanist” who never was a satanist – Christian comedian Mike Warnke – blatantly making up “the secret meaning” of various occult paraphanalia, (“oh yes, the RED robes…these would be for your SEXUAL workings…”),  for example.

Less funny, were the equally uninformed and deluded police officers on this 20/20 program; Sandy Gallant and Dale Griffiths. Their ignorance of the subject matter was somewhat disturbing, considering their power over the lives of others as law enforcement agents. But not really surprising, considering that their “expert” sources were; fraudulent “former satanic cultists” whose expertise consisted of nothing more than medieval folklore, pop culture storylines and urban legends – such as Mike Warnke and Joan Christiansen, religious bigots peddling satanic conspiracy theories – such as Bob Larson, Tony Alamo and John Todd, and teenage dabblers making up a Heavy Metal fandom “satanism” out of their own imaginations.

Then there were these little children on the program, apparently stating they had been forced into participation in human sacrifice rituals with infant victims. (There were passing references to sexual abuse victimization as well, but the children were not shown making such allegations themselves). It was obvious that these kids were relating fantasies, but it was also clear that the children had not made up these stories themselves, that they were not the real ‘authors’ of these fantasies. This was demonstrated when a five-point “satanic crime indicators” list was repeatedly referred to later in the program.  Adults in the program including the host, police detective Sandy Gallant and the children’s relatives/caregivers repeatedly blamed the children for the falsehoods enumerated in this indicators list, claiming “this is what the children have been telling us”.  Some people however, such as Neo-pagan anti-defamation activists who had been monitoring the Fundamentalist-Evangelical “anti-occult” war on popular culture, would recognise this satanic crime indicators list as a compilation of urban legends that had been created and circulated by adult members of Fundamentalist-Evangelical organizations long before any child was alleged to have “disclosed” it. Here it is;

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The Politics of Unconditional Belief

I like Tom Arnold. Give us a thumbs-up, Tom!

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I didn’t care much for his acting in television shows or movies, but I like him when he’s just being himself on a talkshow or an interview. He strikes me as very ‘real’ and genuine, for some reason.

I particularly like Tom Arnold when he’s talking about his childhood sexual abuse experience. He says that, from the ages of 4 to 7, he was repeatedly sexually abused by a 19 year old babysitter. Arnold’s accusations against this person haven’t been validated through a trial and criminal conviction, but nevertheless I don’t have a problem believing in the truth of what he claims took place.

I believe Tom Arnold’s child sex abuse victim narrative.

I don’t have any problem believing that the overwhelming majority of convictions for sex crimes against children, sex crimes against women, and sex crimes against men, are valid and that the testimony of the victims was honest and truthful.

I have serious problems, however, with demands that unconditional belief must be extended to any and all sex crime victim claimants. I found a moderate version of this demand in a discussion about memory science by Carol Tavris, which will serve for a simple illustration of this demand rant: “One of the bright, glaring, non-negotiable truths I have learned, though, is to believe survivors. Believe them, even if they don’t remember everything. Believe them, even if they remember almost nothing. Believe them, even if the person they say raped them seems like the nicest person in the world to you. Believe them, even if it shatters your whole world to do so. Believe them, even if they don’t want to share details, or press charges, or ever talk about it again. Believe them, even if their story sounds implausible to you.”

No. I’m not willing to accede to such demands for unconditional belief.

But, why not? Why not grant unconditional belief to any and all sex abuse victim claimants? Superficially, at least, extending unconditional belief would appear a simple act of kindness & generosity – one that would cost me nothing and seemingly could do me no harm. So…if I’m really sincere about believing that almost every sex crime conviction is valid, if I can extend belief to Tom Arnold even without the evidence of a supporting conviction, why not grant unconditional belief to every victim claimant?

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Mark Schwartz, accused of malpractice, removed from Castlewood clinic staff

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Castlewood Treatment Center. Photo: ABC News

The bizarre nature of the lawsuits created a minor, short-lived sensation among the national press at the times of their filings. The first, dated November 21, 2011 — Lisa Nasseff vs. Castlewood Treatment Center, LLC. — alleged to gross malpractice suffered while undergoing “treatment” at the St. Louis eating disorders clinic. To quote directly from the suit:

“defendant carelessly and negligently hypnotized plaintiff at a time when she was under the influence of various psychotropic medications and said hypnotic treatment directly caused or contributed to cause the creation, reinforcement, or increase in plaintiff’s mind, of false memories including the following:

a) Plaintiff suffered physical and sexual abuse;
b) Plaintiff suffered multiple rapes;
c) Plaintiff suffered satanic ritual abuse;
d) Plaintiff was caused to believe she was a member of a satanic cult and that she was involved in or perpetrated various criminal and horrific acts of abuse;
e) Plaintiff was caused to believe that she had multiple personalities at one time totaling twenty separate personalities.” Continue reading

ReStoried “Survivors”: Are They Trapped In Limbo?

Imagine that you are a troubled person, with a history of mental health disorders, chronic substance abuse, or self-sabotaged personal relationships and serial employment failures.
Imagine that your self-image might be extremely negative – your entrenched belief that you are hopelessly flawed, ‘broken’, ‘crazy’ and worthless, being reinforced by pervasive negative social attitudes toward persons with a life history like yours.

Imagine that you’ve been in some kind of therapy or treatment program before, and perceived similarly negative attitudes about your life history and future prospects from your doctors/ therapists/treatment staff – that your disorders are a life sentence, that perhaps you can be stabilized in the short term, but you will remain ill and cannot expect to ever have a life as fulfilling or meaningful as you might have if you were ‘normal’. This was a common attitude among many mental health professionals in the past, and has been labeled “the treatment paradigm” by reformers seeking to break-out from this model’s dominance in their professions. Continue reading

“I can’t heal unless you believe”

“You must believe us” (children of the damned by “mistertrece @ deviantart.com)

I was watching the childish antics of the Survivor cult on Amazon’s comment boards today – mostly Satanic Ritual Abuse and Dissociative Identity Disorder claimants – I was struck by how blatant and aggressive their blackmail efforts have become over the years.

“We can’t heal until we are believed”, states an apparent SRA claimant allegedly in treatment for DID. Continue reading

Repeal the Opinion Entitlement: How the ‘right to an opinion’ cripples debate

Equality of opinion is the oppression of the masses

Somewhere lurking amongst middle-American fears of local Al-Qaeda operative cells, satanic cults, and White House-hatched Socialist coups is the specter of the anti-American “entitlement”. Entitlements — or “hand-outs” — coddle the weak, foster a culture of dependency, and discourage healthy self-reliance. They mock the American ideals of hard work, independence, and self-determined grit.

…Or so we’re told by those who believe that they are entitled to their opinion on the matter. I believe, however, that this entitlement, too — the Opinion Entitlement — should also be questioned for the deleterious effects it has had upon those whom it is meant to protect. In fact, before the matter of social entitlements — or any other issue — can reasonably be debated, we must first outright repeal this intellectual entitlement of the opinion. Continue reading